Archive for Piercing and Aftercare Information

Thanks for checking out Part Two of Bodycandy.com’s discussion of piercing and acupuncture, “On Pins and Needles.”  After receiving several follow up questions to Ann’s March 8 blog post: “Can the Daith Piercing Cure Migraine Headaches?” (which you can check out by clicking here) we wanted to delve deeper into the discussion of piercing in relation to acupuncture. Today’s post focuses on some of the data that was evident after my research. Check out Part Three on July 29th to hear about a solid study I discovered of piercing and acupuncture combined!

knowledge-1052010__180

“I’m an English major, guys. I love this nerd stuff”–Me


First up: testimonials. There is no doubt about it. A lot of people are saying that they are having success with the daith and other piercings as a pain management tool. Here are a few common elements that I have observed while following up on this aspect of piercing and acupuncture:

  • Many people heard about this piercing online or from friends and then tried it for themselves.
  • Many of the testimonials were given within a few weeks to one month of the original piercing.
  • Very few of the testimonials mentioned the consultation of a trained acupuncture professional or piercer with acupuncture training.

Next: piercing professionals. Though this topic is widely discussed online very few piercing professionals boast professional training BOTH in the art of piercing and in the study of acupuncture.

  • To be specific, I found one piercing professional who has trained with a licensed and respected acupuncturist. This is not to say that there are not more, just that they were not evident after a few hours of online research.
  • This is to say that if your piercer claims to be trained in both—>DO YOUR RESEARCH! Both pain management and acupuncture specialists undergo medical training and screening to become licensed. Giving untrained medical advice is a crime and unprofessional too. 

Finally: acupuncturists studying both acupuncture and piercing. Again, I found one who happens to have worked with the ONE piercing professional (that one up there^) that has trained in acupuncture. 

  • The gist is this–all roads point to two ladies and their combined work in professional piercing and acupuncture.

Check back July 29th for a final installment of “On Pins and Needles,” where I will finally give up that hard data on what a piercing professional and trained acupuncturist have to say about piercing and acupuncture in combined practice. 

Click here to reach Ann’s original blog post discussing the Daith and Migraines, or here to see Part One of “On Pins and Needles!”


Have some experience with our topic? Let us know by leaving your comment!


EAR PIERCINGS

Location: higher up on the fleshy portion of the ear near where the helix begins

Jewelry: initially, a circular ring or barbell from 22 gauge (0.6mm) up to 14 gauge (1.6mm) is used in lengths/diameters typically ranging from 5/16″ (8mm) to 5/8″ (16mm); jewelry types used can include BCR, horseshoe circular barbell, straight barbell, labret stud, or nostril ring/stud

Healing: total healing time is anywhere from 4-8 weeks; can be longer (up to 9 months!) if your ear’s anatomy has cartilage present where your upper lobe piercing is placed

Aftercare: wash with warm water and antibacterial soap and always make sure your hands are clean; avoid smoking, using public telephones, and sleeping directly on your new piercing; resist the urge to change jewelry prematurely – it’s worth the wait to do it right!

Read More→

Bodycandy.com is familiar with the recent debate about piercings as a tool in the management of chronic pain. After receiving several follow up questions to Ann’s March 8 blog post: “Can the Daith Piercing Cure Migraine Headaches?” (which you can check out by clicking here) we wanted to delve deeper into the discussion of piercing in relation to acupuncture. Yay, research!

knowledge-1052010__180

“I’m an English major, guys. I love this nerd stuff”–Me

In this first segment of “On Pins and Needles,” I’m going to summarize my basic findings. In part two, available next week, we’ll discuss the hard facts available on this complicated subject.

ce43ff_ea14e5cb24174167a3dc522511163953

Head to http://www.jefsaunders.com and his “Confessions of a Piercing Nerd” blog for the perspective of a humorous skeptic who happens to be a piercer too!

Available information on acupuncture and pain management through piercing suggest one clear fact: There aren’t many facts. There is, however, lots of discussion. Three main voices emerge in the argument for and against the combined practice:

  • individuals getting pierced: testimonials!
  • piercing professionals
  • acupuncturists studying both

Common discourse today revolves around the daith piercing (shown to the right–>) but further research reveals a more in-depth discussion.

The following bullets contain an initial summary of the established facts and strongly held opinions of individuals and professionals involved with this topic: 

  • Most accredited acupuncture associations are hesitant to take a stance on permanent piercings and acupuncture, claiming insufficient study or that fields like auriculotherapy (a relatively modern evolution specialized at the ear) are too far removed from traditional practice to comment on.
  • Testimonials by piercers as well as people who have gotten their daith and other acupuncture points pierced come in all shapes and sizes. Claims of no effect, partial or completely reduced pain for two weeks to one month, and emotional accounts of total relief from pain are all common.
  • Very few piercers are trained in acupuncture or work closely with acupuncturists. Reputable professional piercers speak on this issue with caution because of laws that restrict offering opinions that could be misunderstood as medical. If your piercer is claiming direct knowledge in this area, follow up. Ask questions! Don’t be fooled by opinions or inexperience.
  • Very few acupuncturists are trained in the art of piercing or work closely with piercers, though they tend to be versed in the effects of interruption of the body’s natural energy flow–Qi–and the effects of scar tissue on frequently used acupuncture points. While this knowledge isn’t specifically based on piercing experience, some of it still applies.

Check back next week to hear more about what I learned about permanent piercings and acupuncture treatments. Click here to reach Ann’s original blog post discussing the Daith and Migraines.


Click here for Part Two of “On Pins and Needles,” (available Friday, July 15th) and here for Part Three (available July 29th) to learn about a few of the related facts and studies that I discovered! Have some experience with our topic? Let us know by leaving your comment!


 


Money Shot: 0:10

BodyCandy team member Liz decided to get her second nose piercing done recently. “I didn’t really have any expectations, other than having a needle go through my nostril,” she said. That’s the beauty of being pierced and proud!

Of course we headed to American Skin Art (located in Buffalo, NY) to let James work his magic.

“It was the best piercing experience I’ve ever had, honestly. James at American Skin Art was nothing but professional through the preparation, physical piercing, and even after.”

Liz’s nose piercing started just like all piercings do, with some quick cleaning to sterilize her nostril for the piercing. James was careful to measure perfectly so that both sides of Liz’s nose would line up symmetrically. The piercing itself involves inserting a hollow receiving tube into the nostril, which will prevent the needle from poking the inside of the nose. Liz takes a deeeeep breath, and James then pushes the needle through. The tube slides out of the nostril, and James attaches a cork to the exposed sharp end of the needle.

James then pushes the needle the remainder of the way through the piercing, following closely behind with the jewelry. “The most uncomfortable part was the transition from the needle to the actual jewelry, just the same for any other piercing,” Liz said. And that’s that!

“The piercing itself is not painful by any means. There’s a bit of noticeable discomfort while smiling and yawning. You realize just how much you move your nose with a fresh nostril piercing! Other than that, the piercing only causes a dull ache that is easily forgotten. I haven’t experienced any swelling yet, and it’s been almost five hours after the piercing.”

Healing Time: 3-4 months
Initial jewelry: Nose screw

standard ear lobe piercing

Location: the fleshy area of the lower part of your ear where the lobe is at its fullest

Jewelry: initially, a circular ring or barbell from 22 gauge (0.6mm) up to 18 gauge (1mm) is used in lengths/diameters typically ranging from 5/16″ (8mm) to 5/8″ (16mm), but gauge sizes up to 10 gauge (2.4mm) can be pierced in this location; jewelry types used can also include BCR, horseshoe circular barbell, straight barbell, labret stud, or nostril ring/stud

Healing: total healing time is anywhere from 4-8 weeks; generally is an easy and quick healing process

Aftercare: wash with warm water and antibacterial soap and always make sure your hands are clean; avoid smoking, using public telephones, and sleeping directly on your new piercing; resist the urge to change jewelry prematurely – it’s worth the wait to do it right!

Read More→

 

SMILEY PIERCING - Header Image

Upper Lip Frenulum (a.k.a. smiley, scrumper) Piercing

Welcomed to the world of piercing in the 1990s after gaining notice in a magazine publication, the smiley piercing has certainly gained popularity in recent years for quite a few reasons. The smiley is pierced through a thin strip of flesh that attaches the center of the upper lip to the gum plate; this little piece of flesh is called the upper lip frenulum, hence the official name of the piercing. Because of the differences found in size and shape of the upper lip frenulum, some may not have the ideal anatomy for this piercing, so be sure to check with your local piercer to see if the smiley is a possibility for you!

Read More→

TONGUE WEB PIERCING- Header Image

Frenulum Linguae (Tongue Web, Under Tongue, Marley) Piercing

This piercing is located where the connective under-layers (or the “webs” that distinguish the fenulum linguae from the rest of it all) that attach the tongue to the lower gum plate are found. The tongue web, which is what the frenulum linguae is more commonly referred to, is the part of our oral anatomy that allows us to speak, so some people believe that this piercing may influence or encourage those who have it to think more before speaking. The best part of all? This piercing is completely hidden (unless you’re intentionally showing it off), so it’s the perfect solution for piercing fanatics that aren’t allowed to have them visible for any reason.

Read More→

Thinking about getting your nipples pierced? Then you definitely want to check out this video (with the perfect featured still shot) of Ann’s reaction to getting horizontal nipple piercings done by piercing professional, James, from American Skin Art in our hometown of Buffalo, NY.

Money Shot: 0:30 and 1:08

Healing Time: 6 to 9 months for females and 3 to 4 months for males
Initial Jewelry: 14 gauge solid titanium straight barbells or circular rings with the length or diameter depending on the size of your nipple

Want to hear more about Ann’s experience?

Click on the “Read More” link below to see what she personally has to say about her experience and the healing process of getting both of her nipples pierced. If you still aren’t satisfied on your nipple piercing education after that, check out some of our other blog posts on the subject. Oh, and make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel for more content on body piercings and modification culture for your viewing pleasure!

Read More→

In recent years, coated and plated body jewelry has become popular in the culture of pierced and modified individuals because the processes used offer more vivid color options than the traditional look of common base metals.
It’s a fact that plated and coated jewelry materials require special care and cleaning. Some of the outer layers may peel, chip away, crack off, or break down over time as a result of your jewelry being in contact with moisture and heat generated by your own body. Plated and coated jewelry are not recommended for wear in initial or healing piercings.

The types of coated and plated jewelry we have available include:
coatedjewelry

Both ceramic and enamel coatings provide your body jewelry with a shine that can be maintained for a long time and both materials are durable and hard to scratch.
Enamel coated body jewelry comes in a unique range of colors. It is very smooth and feels comfortable to wear in pretty much any piercing, so it is commonly used in areas like lip piercings and ear piercings. It will hold up better to moisture than other coated or plated items as well.
Ceramic coated body jewelry offers high shine and plenty of colorful options. The ceramic used in this type of coating is the same type of ceramic material used on industrial tools and as a heat guard in space shuttles. It can still be chipped if dropped or banged up against other objects, especially jewelry, so you should store ceramic plated items separate from your other jewelry.platedjewelryElectroplating is a process that coats an object with a thin layer of metal, giving the plating its color and brightness. Plating on jewelry that is frequently worn will eventually dull and fade depending on the quality of the plating (thickness), the wearer’s body chemistry, and the surrounding environment (air quality and humidity).pvd jewelryPhysical vapor deposition (PVD) is a vacuum deposition technique where metal is vaporized into an atmosphere that consists of partly ionized gasses and then, atom by atom, the metal is transitioned from its solid phase into its vapor phase and then back into its solid phase, building a film over the jewelry’s surface. It is most frequently encountered as an outer coating over titanium or stainless steel body jewelry and can be used in an autoclave or steam sterilization treatments. PVD coatings offer high durability and wear resistance as well as resistance to discoloration, tarnishing, high corrosion, and UV radiation.ipjewelryIon plating (IP) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process that allows jewelry coating to bond with the stainless steel that is usually used beneath it. Ion plating is more durable, more wear resistant, and also provides higher brightness than traditional methods of plating jewelry. The process involves adding a titanium nitrade layer to the component being plated and then applying an extremely thin layer of gold. After that, at a very low pressure, solid metal vaporizes and becomes electric ions. Ion plating uses concurrent or periodic bombardment of these energetic particles on the metal to create the layer of coating.anodizedjewelryAnodized body jewelry is created through a process in which an electrical current is applied to the metal that changes the way the surface of metal refracts light, which results in a coated layer of color. In most jewelry, an anodized titanium coating will be made over surgical grade stainless steel. The interference of light reflecting off the oxide layer reflecting off the metal beneath it is what determines the color you see.

Read More→

bannerstylesWhen someone says “nose piercing” they’re usually referring to the body modification that is pierced and rests in the curve of one of the nostrils. Depending on where you find yourself culturally, “nose piercing” can take on a more general meaning and can refer to piercings such as the septum or the bridge of the nose. This broad sense of the term is also found when referring to the jewelry as a “nose ring” because this term is commonly used to reference any piece of jewelry worn in the nose. Besides the standard nose piercing that is simply a solitary piercing made in the natural crease of your nostril, there are a variety of other piercings that are found around the same area, including:

Double Nostril – two holes are created with the first piercing being higher than the other; requires a strategic and professional piercer due to the risk of hitting nerve structures; jewelry used are nose bones, nostril screws, l-shaped , nose hoops, circular barbells and even captive bead rings

Triple Nostril – requires more precautions in creating patterns to ensure nerve structures are not affected; most convenient jewelry used in this type are nose bones; commonly seen on the top crease of the nostril in a triangular pattern

High Nostril – jewelry is placed a few centimeters above the natural curve of the nostril crease; jewelry options for the high nostril piercing is limited to nose bones, l-shaped, and nostril screws

There are a total of five types of nose rings that are available for purchase on BodyCandy.com: the hoop, nose bone, l-shaped, nose screw, and fishtail.Nose Ring TypesThe first four options are worn and chosen by the wearer’s necessity or personal preference, but the fifth style – the fishtail – is customizable and can be made into any variety of the other styles. Any of the five options available can be worn based on your own preference for comfort, sizing, or aesthetics. Nose jewelry has the ability to be beautiful with the many stylistic options you have in store for your choice, but it also has the added plus of being surprisingly versatile with the many types available and the ability to customize for a perfect fit and style.

Read More→